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3 Mistakes to Avoid When Creating Your Receptionist Training Manual

Receptionist Training

3 Mistakes to Avoid When Creating Your Receptionist Training Manual

Are you tasked with creating a training manual for new front-desk hires? It’s a big job, but one that will streamline the onboarding and training process and make everyone’s life a lot easier. It’s important to avoid the pitfalls associated with building a receptionist training manual — follow these tips, and you’ll be able to create a document that serves your business well for years to come.

Making it Too Long

 

The first rule of thumb to follow: don’t make your receptionist training manual too long. When one hears the word “manual,” thoughts of heavy, 100-page-or-more booklets come to mind. You’ll want to stray away from this, because it’s simply too much. New hires will get overwhelmed when they’re presented with this manual, and you’ll become overwhelmed when creating it.

 

Keep your receptionist training manual relatively short; cover what you need to, but never allow it to stretch on unnecessarily. In most cases, it’s wise to keep the manual under 20 pages.

Making it Too Dense

 

Even a receptionist training manual that is the proper length can be too dense when it comes to the content within. It’s very important that your manual isn’t overly complicated and complex, because it won’t engage with the new hires that are reading it.

 

Break up your receptionist training manual into chapters, and break up those chapters into sections. Within the sections, use bullet points and small paragraphs to make all content easily digestible. Simple measures like these will keep your manual from becoming too dense.

Making it Too Vague

 

Remember to remain specific when crafting your receptionist training manual — don’t leave things open to interpretation. Clearly outline the job responsibilities, business policies, company culture, hours, pay, etc. so that everyone is on the same page. Use clear, concise, and conversational language; avoid overly busy or verbose language so that there’s no chance of misinterpretation on the part of the reader.

 

Keep these common pitfalls in mind, and you’re well on your way to creating a thorough, well-crafted receptionist training manual that stands the test of time. Plus, you’ll have a foundational document that can easily be updated as needed. New front-desk hires will be able to integrate into your team without a hitch!

Zuhaib
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